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TRACE

Transpiration Cooling Experiment

Transpiration cooling

• Blowing out cooling gas from a porous surface
• Effective cooling of the boundary layer
• So far only tested in wind tunnel tests and simulations
• Inexpensive and suitable for quick reuse
• Not yet used for heat shields
• Validation in the flight test is a crucial step towards deployment in future    applications

REUSABLE HEATSHIELD

Till now modern systems are constructed for just one flight.

TESTS IN REAL ENVIROMENT

Never was this technology tested outside of windtunnels or simulations

OUTFLOW OF COOLINGAS

Cooling gas should escape through a porous surface and actively cool the shield

• German-Swedish student program
• 2 rockets every year since 2007
• Altitude 70-90km
• 40kg payload divided into 3 student experiments

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Our Support

Program Organizers

Project Phases Overview

Mission Objectives

• Maximum speed over Mach 3.5
• Aerodynamic optimization for high speed
• Passive aerodynamic stabilization
• Maximum heat load at low altitude
• Late parachute opening of the data module at an altitude of less than 8 km
• Parachute opening speed ~ Mach 2.0

Challenges

One step closer !

TRACE – Transpiration Cooling Experiment Heat shields are crucial for the re-entry of all orbital spacecraft and are an integral part of future reusable (re-)entry vehicles. A design concept for such heat shields, which is currently being studied, is based on transpirative cooling. A cooling gas is injected at the surface of the structure to reduce the thermal loads. Although this concept has already undergone extensive research and wind tunnel tests, transpiration cooling has not been used for spacecraft heat shield systems so far. TRACE will now for the first time test and validate transpiration cooling on a re-entry body in a flight experiment.

REXUS